Green Seam

RHS Winners

The story is strong. It is the story of the regeneration and revitalisation of the area. While celebrating East Kent’s mining heritage, the garden depicts the transformation of a former colliery site into a sustainable park for education, sustainable business and community use.

Green Seam part of the Hadlow Group

The History

Betteshanger colliery opened in the late 1920s and was the largest of the Kent collieries. It had two shafts of almost 2300 feet, plaques can still be seen where the shafts were once sunk. Betteshanger had a tradition of union militancy; it was the first pit to come out on strike during the second World War and took active part in the miners’ strikes of 1972, 1974 and 1984/5. After the end of the 1984/5 strike, Betteshanger became known for the brutality with which strikebreakers were treated. Posters had gone up in the village with photographs and names of the 30 men who had broken the strike.

It was the last Kent colliery to close, closing for good in 1989. The colliery was served by a railway branch which left the main line between Deal & Sandwich.

learn more...

Lift

The Concept

The story is strong. It is the story of the regeneration and revitalisation of the area. While celebrating east Kent’s mining heritage, the garden depicts the transformation of a former colliery site into a sustainable park for education, sustainable business and community use. 

Named Green Seam, the Hadlow garden for Hampton Court is designed by Bethany Williams and Stuart Charles Towner, both of whom will graduate with BA (Hons) in Garden Design from Hadlow College/University of Greenwich later this year.Their design depicts the transformation of the colliery site into a sustainable park that offers new hope for the surrounding communities: the black seam of coal becomes the green seam of hope.The garden demonstrates how pioneer plant species can colonise apparently hostile environments such as spoil heaps and transform them into places of beauty.

It shows the contrasts between the dark colliery spoil and the vivid greens and pinks of pioneer plants such as Chamerion augustifolium tempered by the whites and silvers of birches and aspens.The framework of native plants featured in the garden supports indigenous wildlife. A black wall represents the coalface and divides the space between the ‘wild’ spoil heap and the ‘tamed’ garden.Coal pillars represent the miners; a lift cage symbolises the miners’ daily descent to the mine workings. Black opaque pillars represent the future.

learn more...

The garden shows the contrast between the dark colliery spoil and the vivid greens and pinks of the plants - the black seam of coal becomes a green seam of sustainable growth.

The garden shows the contrast between the dark colliery spoil and the vivid greens and pinks of the plants - the black seam of coal becomes a green seam of sustainable growth.

Green Seam Inspirational Plan

Green Seam Inspirational Plan

Green Seam Plan in Progress

Green Seam Plan in Progress

We Won Best in Show!

Amazing news. We won best show garden. Again, thanks again to everyone's hard work!

read more...

The Build - Update - Completion

It is press day at the RHS Hampton Court Flower Show and we are finally complete.

read more...

The Build - Update - Week 4

It is the last week before the Show, everything is looking so fantastic. Big thank you to everyone that helped with throughout the whole process.

read more...